Wednesday, April 10, 2013

"Edward Adrift," by Craig Lancaster

This endearing story will have you laughing out loud. His own carefully-controlled life disrupted, Edward Stanton seeks to help out a friend's troubled son, by taking him on a road trip.

Edward Adrift, by Craig Lancaster

"...Edward Stanton is one of the more distinct and interesting characters you'll encounter in contemporary fiction, and it's never dull accompanying him. Edward Adrift, like 600 Hours before it, is such a well-written, big-hearted book that its pages fly by and will leave its readers no doubt hoping for a trilogy." —Billings Gazette 

"Edward Stanton is back! And he returns in a darkly funny novel that's frequently lyrical and exhibits an uncanny grace. Once again, Craig Lancaster blesses us with a glimpse of universal emotions, and how the turnings of a human heart can be simple and complex at the same time." —Ron Franscell, bestselling author of The Sourtoe Cocktail Club 

"It's hard to know who I adore more: Craig Lancaster's character Edward Stanton or Lancaster himself for creating him." —Jessica Park, author of Flat-Out Love

It’s been a year of upheaval for Edward Stanton, a forty-two-year-old with Asperger’s syndrome. He’s lost his job. His trusted therapist has retired. His best friends have moved away. And even his nightly ritual of watching Dragnet reruns has been disrupted. All of this change has left Edward, who lives his life on a rigid schedule, completely flummoxed.

But when his friend Donna calls with news that her son Kyle is in trouble, Edward leaves his comfort zone in Billings, Montana, and drives to visit them in Boise, where he discovers Kyle has morphed from a sweet kid into a sullen adolescent. Inspired by dreams of the past, Edward goes against his routine and decides to drive to a small town in Colorado where he once spent a summer with his father—bringing Kyle along as his road trip companion. The two argue about football and music along the way, and amid their misadventures, they meet an eccentric motel owner who just might be the love of Edward’s sheltered life—if only he can let her.

Endearing and laugh-out-loud funny, Edward Adrift is author Craig Lancaster’s sequel to 600 Hours of Edward.


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Meet the Author

"I have these incredibly vivid memories of visiting Montana with my folks on family vacations, and following my dad, an itinerant laborer who worked in the oil and gas fields of the West when I was a kid," novelist Craig Lancaster says. "It was such a vast, beautiful, overwhelming place. From the first time I saw Montana, I wanted to be a part of it."

A couple of years after Lancaster's in the Big Sky State in his mid-30s, he began chasing a long-held dream: writing novels. His debut, "600 Hours of Edward," was born in 2008 in the crucible of National Novel Writing Month, that every-November free-for-all of furious writing. In October 2009, it was published by Riverbend Publishing of Helena, Montana, and has since gone on to be selected as a Montana Honor Book and a High Plains Book Award winner. In 2012, it was acquired by Amazon Publishing and re-released, gaining a whole new cadre of fans.

His follow-up, "The Summer Son," was released in January 2011 by AmazonEncore, to similar acclaim. Booklist called the new novel "a classic western tale of rough lives and gruff, dangerous men, of innocence betrayed and long, stumbling journeys to love." It was a Utah Book Award finalist.

Next came "Quantum Physics and the Art of Departure," a collection of short fiction, including pieces Lancaster originally published in Montana Quarterly magazine. That book, released by Missouri Breaks Press, came out in December 2011 and was a 2012 Independent Publishers Book Awards gold medalist and High Plains Book Award finalist.

In April 2013, Edward Stanton, the main character in Lancaster's debut novel, appears again in the eagerly anticipated "Edward Adrift," also published by Amazon Publishing.

Lancaster's work, hailed for its character-driven narratives, delves deeply below the surface, getting at the grit and the glory of lives ordinary and extraordinary.

"It's all too easy to turn people into caricatures, but the truth is, we humans are pretty damned fascinating," he says. "For me, fiction is a way at getting at truth. I use it to examine the world around me, the things that disturb me, the questions I have about life -- whether my own or someone else's. My hope is that someone reading my work will have their own emotional experience and bring their own thoughts to what they read on the page."

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